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This section of the website is for UK healthcare professionals only. If you are not a healthcare professional, please click here.
This section of the website is for UK healthcare professionals only. If you are not a healthcare professional, please click here.

Which of your patients could benefit from NEXPLANON®?

Women considering new or different contraceptive methods may have a range of needs and concerns. Read the fictional case studies below to find out how NEXPLANON® could address common issues.

NISHA, 19

“I often forget to take my daily contraceptive”

JESSICA, 37

“I'm really worried about getting pregnant”

TESSA, 24

“My periods are heavy and painful”

MEGAN, 32

“I have a history of deep vein thrombosis”

NEXPLANON® SIDE EFFECTS AND OTHER SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS1

Very common (≥1/10) side effects: vaginal infection; headache; acne; breast tenderness; breast pain; menstruation irregular; weight increased.

Common (≥1/100 to <1/10) side effects: increased appetite; affect lability; depressed mood; nervousness; libido decreased; dizziness; hot flush; abdominal pain; nausea; flatulence; alopecia; dysmenorrhoea; ovarian cyst; implant site pain; implant site reaction; fatigue; influenza like illness; pain; weight decreased.

Uncommon (≥1/1,000 to <1/100): pharyngitis; rhinitis; urinary tract infection; hypersensitivity; anxiety; insomnia; migraine; somnolence; vomiting; constipation; diarrhoea; hypertrichosis; rash; pruritus; back pain; arthralgia; myalgia; musculoskeletal pain; dysuria; genital discharge; vulvovaginal discomfort; galactorrhoea; breast enlargement; pruritus genital; pyrexia; oedema.

Complications of insertion: there have been reports of migration of the implant within the arm from the insertion site, which may be related to a deep insertion, or external forces (eg manipulation of the implant or contact sports). There also have been rare postmarketing reports of implants located within the vessels of the arm and the pulmonary artery, which may be related to deep insertions or intravascular insertion. In cases where the implant has migrated within the arm from the insertion site, localisation of the implant may be more difficult and removal may require a minor surgical procedure with a larger incision or a surgical procedure in an operating room. In cases where the implant has migrated to the pulmonary artery endovascular or surgical procedures may be needed for removal. If at any time the implant cannot be palpated, it should be localised and removal is recommended as soon as medically appropriate. If the implant is not removed, contraception and the risk of progestogen-related undesirable effects may continue beyond the time desired by the woman. Expulsion may occur especially if the implant is not inserted according to the instructions given, or as a consequence of local inflammation.

GB-XPL-115006 | Date of preparation: July 2021

GB-XPL-115076 | Date of preparation: July 2021